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iERY. 
3TS 

63G 

NEW YORK 32, NEW YORK 



THE 



DENTAL 



COLUMBIAN 



1969 



Editors: 



LLOYD HARRIS 
JULIUS KUNOFSKY 



Dental Hygiene Editor: 

THERESA MTZLING 

Faculty Advisor: 

DR. VICTOR CAROMA 




DEDICATION 








Joseph Scancarello, D.D.S 



Dr. Scancarello once told a few of us, "One of the most impor- 
tant things in life is to gain the respect and admiration of those 
around you." Everything he has done for us has yielded this 
reward for him, not in the form of a cold I.O.U. on our part, but 
rather in our sincere innermost feelings. Few men can give so 
completely of themselves to help others. 

His range of love and dedication to the student is only sur- 
passed by the volume and depth of his laugh. He revels not only 
in the hearing of a good joke but also in the construction of a good 
piece of dentistry. He shares the happiness of our successes and 
the frustration of our mistakes, because when he gives us advice 
about a case, it becomes his case also. 

Our clinical exposure tohimis unfortunately very short, only 
two years. What we take from him lasts much longer, a lifetime. 
And he has built his philosophy of teaching upon this thought. 
Each year, when he must overcome the depression of losing the 
previous graduation class, he rededicates himself to a new group, 
moulding what he hopes will be a thinking, intelligent, and 
complete professional man. That is why many years from now, 
we will have forgotten our first denture case, our undercut crown 
preps, even our cursed sixty points. But we will not have forgot- 
ten his pat on the back or the things he said and did for us. 

And as a result of his sincerity, warmth, humor, help and love, 
we the Class of 1969, reap a tremendous reward of having the 
pleasure of dedicating our yearbook to 

Dr. Joseph Scancarello. 





We Thank You 



ADMINISTRATION 




Melvin Moss, D.D.S., Ph.D 
DEAN 




George O'Grady, D.D.S 
ASSISTANT DEAN 



Gilbert Smith, D.D.S. 

DEAN EMERITUS 
PROF. OF DENTISTRY 




GRADUATES 






GRADUATES 




MARVIN BERGER 

B.A., Tulane University, 1965 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 




^ . 





ROGER B. BOWDEN 

B.A., Gettysburg College, 1965 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 







DONALD M. BROWN 

University of California, Berkeley 
D.D.S., Columbia, J 969 






RALPH C. CICERO 

B.S., Manhattan College, 1965 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






STEPHEN R. DAVIS 

A.B., Boston University, 1965 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






E. GRANT ESHELMAN, JR. 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1965 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 







V 





STEVEN IRA FEIN 

B.S., Trinity College, 1964 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






MICHAEL JAMES FIDLER 

Merrimack College 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






i v i * 







JOEL Z. FINEBERG 

B.A., Columbia College, I960 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






JACK H. GOETZ 

Hofstra University 
D.D.S., Columbia, '1969 





BERILL G. GOODKIN 

B.S., Brooklyn College of Pharmacy, 1958 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 







CHARLES F. GUELAKIS 

B.A., University of Connecticut, 1965 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 







LLOYD S. HARRIS 

B.A., University oj Pittsburgh, 1965 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






ALLAN B. KLEIN 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1965 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






JULIUS E. KUNOFSKY 

Teshiva University 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






AUSTIN I. MEHRHOF, JR 

B. A., Colgate University, 1964 

M.A., 1965 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






ALLEN J. PINTOFF 

B.S., The City College of New York, 1965 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






MICHAEL ALAN RUBIN 

B.A., Ho bar t College, 1965 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 




i 






I 



EPHRAIM ELLIOTT SHULMAN 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1965 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 





V 





\ 



j 




DONALD F. SNOW 

B.S., Manhattan College, 1965 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






JOSEPH L. WASILESKI 

B.A., University of Buffalo 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






CHARLES J. YOUNG 

B.A., Colgate University, 1963 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






DAVID J. ZEGARELLI 

B.A. } Columbia College, 1965 
D.D.S., Columbia, 1969 






OUR FIRST YEAR 





AS SOPHOMORES 




32 



AS JUNIORS 




"ONLY SIXTY POINTS 
TO GO!" 



33 



REMEMBER WHEN? 




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tp^. *» 









I 






34 




CI 



>.. 




\ 














Ji 




I 





35 



i.n. PliLP DOS 




© 






"DENTAL 




'Biscuit Bake' 




'Occlusal Plane' 




'Lower Arch" 



"Pulp Out" 




36 



'Aluminum Shell' 



TERMINOGRAPHY" 




'Favorable Crown Root Ratio' 




"Wig-L-Bug" 



S 




\ * 
"Porcelain Jacket' 




'Pulp Cap' 





"Solder Joint" 



"Shoed Cusp' 



PERSONAL 













^ FT- -'■■ 



"bite 





38 



GLIMPSES 







* 



+ 






_v 



Jf 










39 



WISH I'D 








"No, Dr. Cain, you've already had four 
carpules." 



"I wish Goetz was here to help me with 
this." 



"There's a little stain on that tooth. 
Yank it." 






"Let's see, Funnies . . Page 14.' 



"Dr. Mandel, would you mind keeping 
your eyes on the patient?!" 



'Zin Rock Time' 




and lead them out of Egypt to 




vhere? 



"See the big dog. Run Spot, run.' 




■* 



it ^ wm 

•Then the little '/$!.'% bit me.' 



40 



SAID THAT 






"This ought to shake the sugar loose.' 



•'The original Fibber McGee & Molly 1 



"Sure you got all the calculus, Pintoff, 
but your history is only 6 pages long." 






"Then you put the square peg in the 
round hole." 



"Gee, other than the hole, it fits real 
well." 



m not sweating points. 






"And, who disquised as the mild- 
mannered clinic administracor . . . " 



"Let's see, 2 regular, 2 with sugar, and 
3 lights . . to go." 



41 






"Vic, that last inlay you waxed didn't 
fit." 



"And the thing on the roots is a crown, 
Marvin." 



Man from Glad 






kJ'^ 



'Excuse me — Is the Dean in?' 



"You mean C.S.C. exams are definitely 
a no, no?" 



"Listed among the causes of Palatal 
Hickies are ..." 






"Now, if you hold the denture like that 
it won't fall." 



"Sure looks like a foot, doesn't it 
Jack?" 



"Just a tittle off the edges." 



42 




NOTE 

OF 

THANKS 





AUSTIN I. MEHRHOF JR 



Class President 





43 



FACULTY 





FACULTY 




FACTA NON VERBA 
Oportet discentem credere (ARISTOTLE) 
Oportet edoctum judicare (ARISTOTLE) 
State super vias antiquas et videte quaenam 

sit via recta et bona et ambulate 

inea.(JEREMIAS) 
Qui respiciunt ad pauca difacili 

pronuncianl (ARISTOTLE) 
Nil tam metuens quam ne dubitare aliqua 

de re videretur (CICERO) 
Verba sapientum tanquam acueli et tanquam 

clavi in ahum defixi (ECCLES) 
Scilicet ingenuas didicisse fideliter 

artes emollit mores nee sinit esse 

feros (OVID) 
Claudus in via antevertit cursorem extra 

viam (SOLOMON) 
Possunt quia posse videntur (VIRGIL) 
Vita sine proposito languida et vaga 

est (SENECA) 
Qui festinat ad divitias non erit 

insons (SOLOMON) 
De lis rebus rogo vos lit cogitationem 

suscipiatis (CAIN) 

Edward A. Cain Jr. D.D.S. 



Edward A. Cain Jr., D.D.S. 
Director 



OPERATIVE DENTISTRY 






Dr. T.Portw 



av 



Dr. R.Boelsllcr 



Dr. F. Mcllana 



46 





I 

n 



Dr. K. Deesen 



Dr. W.Silverstein 



9 

Dr. H. Sherman 





Dr. J. Fiasconaro 



Dr. S. Brzustowicz 






Dr. H. Fritz 



Dr. G. Rudensky 



Dr. S. Scrivani 





*, 



Dr. J. Pianpiano 



Dr. F. Pandolfo 



47 




John J. Lucca, D.D.S. 
Director 



The class of 1969, more so than ever before, faces 
challenges and opportunities in dentistry never 
thought possible only a decade or so ago. Prepay- 
ment plans, Medicare, and the increased overall 
demand for dental services have had a marked 
impact on the character of the practice of dentistry. 

Dental practice in the future will be quite different 
from that as we know it today. Auxiliary personnel 
will have a much more active role. Group practices 
will be much more common. Hospital controlled den- 
tal clinics will be springing up all over the country. 
The dentist will probably have a team of auxiliary 
personnel under his supervision, performing tasks 
presently done only by licensed practitioners. He will 
need skills in office administration and practice man- 
agement which only a small percentage of practitioners 
possess today. He will devote more time to restricted 
areas of dentistry and engage in more meaningful 
preventive programs for his own patients. He will cer- 
tainly need a much greater biologic understanding and 
highly developed diagnostic ability. 

Although the chief goal of the dentist should be 
prevention, the practitioner of the forseeable future 
will still be largely involved with restorative dentistry. 
Of course, it must be remembered that good restorative 
dentistry is preventive dentistry in itself. A great deal 
of progress has been made in the field of restorative 
dentistry to make it easier to perform and with better 
results than ever imagined possible a short time ago. It 
is hoped that with research in time will come a much 
lesser need for even the most advanced restorative 
procedure. 



PROSTHODONTICS 






Dr. J. Scancarello 



Dr. V. Caronia 



Dr.J. Dcjulia 



48 



The Division of Prosthodontics 
takes this opportunity to wish the 
Class of 1969 every success you so 
richlv deserve. We are certain that 
you are prepared to meet, intelli- 
gently, any challenge that modern 
dentistry has to offer. 

John J. Lucca, D.D.S. 





Dr. E. Uccellani 



Dr. W. Lancaster 





Dr. W.Raebeck 



Dr.J.Goldin 



Dr. H. Arden 



Dr. J. Scaroia 





Dr. E. Ras 



Dr.J.DcLisi 



Dr. E. Kesseler 



Dr. G. Hindels 




Drs. F. Cacciola & H. Shpuntoff 



Dr. S. Bruno 



Dr. W. Miller 



Dr. H.Ayers.Jr. 



49 




Edward V. Zegarelli, D.D.S. 

EdwardS. Robinson Professor 
Director 



Graduation is invariably a happy experience for the 
faculty — another class has severed its umbilical attach- 
ment and is now launched into the world to pursue its 
various careers in the profession of dentistry. 

However, this sense of joy is generally tempered by 
the realization that the education which has been 
offered you was, at best, "just not good enough". It is 
woefully inadequate in meeting the expected chal- 
lenges of dentistry in the 1980's. 

The benefits of fluoridation, the effects of improved 
periodontal health, the advantages of improved dental 
materials and equipment and, especially, the tremen- 
dous changes which will be afforded by expanding the 
duties of auxiliary personnel, will all contribute to a 
drastic transformation in the role of the dental practi- 
tioner of the future. 

This transformation will demand sweeping changes 
in our present curriculum. It will necessitate severe 
reductions and even total elimination of courses in 
areas which are expected to play relatively minor roles 
in resolving the challenges of dentistry of the future. 
On the other hand, those subjects which are inherently 
biological such as oral medicine, therapeutics, preven- 
tive and public health dentistry must and will be 
expanded. 

Every member of the Division of Stomatology joins 
me in offering you our congratulations in completing 
the all too-short four year curriculum and in extend- 
ing to you our hope that you will successfully meet the 
challenges of the future. 

E.V. Zegarelli, D.D.S. 



STOMATOLOGY 



r- 



fr% 



<* 

>■*£> 



w ^ 



> 



ir 





Dr.J.Cutlita 



Dr. A. Kutschcr 



Dr. J. Budowsky 



50 




Dr. T. Beckerman 




* \T 



Dr. B. Cooper 




» 

Dr. M. Marder 





Vf 



Dr. S. Stcinerman 




Dr. I. Mandel 



Dr. J. Lind 



Dr. E. Zcrden 



Dr. D.Hendell 




Dr. R. Crowley 




/ 



Dr. F. K.i r I. mi 



.^•7*1 



1 




P" 



^1 



Dr. J. Flavia 





Dr. P. Kornfcld 




Dr.W.Steibel 




«a-3 




Dr. L. Ruiz 




Dr.R.Schiff 




Dr. J. Cinguina 



Dr R.Walsh 



Dr.S.Wolman 



Dr. M. Karmiol 



51 




Frank E. Beube, D.D.S. 

Director 



When you accept your dental diploma at the gradua- 
tion exercises you become committed and obligated to 
some major responsibilities. Your first responsibility is 
to yourself. You will protect that "self" by sincerity, 
objectivity, integrity, and admirable professional 
conduct, which includes as a minimum, excellence of 
direct dental treatments, high ethical standards, and 
most. important, a thorough understanding of yourself 
and other human beings. 

Continuing your professional education is impera- 
tive. Changes will be essential because of the predic- 
tion that dental caries will be prevented in less than a 
decade, and the probability that the factors causing the 
formation of dental calculus might be discovered in the 
not too distant future. Based on these disclosures, it is 
your responsibility and challenge, as the future dental 
clinicians and researchers, to give your attention to the 
treatment of periodental diseases and to determine the 
prime causes of these lesions which result in the loss of 
more teeth than dental caries. 

Although there is truth in, "Men's lives are chains of 
chances and history of their sum," (from Bayard Tay- 
lor's Napoleon at Gotha), you do have considerable 
control over your destiny. It is with this in mind that 
the periodontology staff and myself believe that you 
will attain the best that is within all of you. 

Frank E. Beube, D.D.S. 



PERIODONTICS 






Dr. M. Schwartz 



Dr. D. M<m.tli.iu 



Dr. L. Hirschficld 



52 






Dr. C. Berman 



Dr. A. Cederbaum 



Dr. A.Salkind 




Dr P.Gabriele 




Dr. H.Oshrain 





Dr. S. Algus 




Dr. H. Cantor 





Dr I Karcl 




X 



Dr. N. Joondcph 




^ 



Dr M.Morris 



Dr. B. Wasserman 



Dr. R.Odrich 



53 




The Division of Oral Surgery supports with no 
reservations the concept of the scientific dentist as the 
objective of Columbia's undergraduate dental curricu- 
lum. The program of the division is designed to de- 
velop the student's capability to solve the medical 
and surgical problems of the mouth and jaws through 
the scientific application of basic science facts. This 
takes the form of problem solving as the basis for 
teaching sessions in lectures, seminars and clinics. 

The Division takes this opportunity of reminding the 
Class of 1969 of their good fortune of having received 
their undergraduate training here at Columbia. We do 
so in the security of knowing that when you enter 
advanced training in the hospital, dental school or 
federal services you will have many opportunities to 
agree with this philosophy. You go with our best 
wishes and our assurances that you have within you the 
potential for leadership and our hopes that you will 
use it wisely. 

Rudolph H. Friedrich, D.D.S. 



Rudolph H. Friedrich, D.D.S. 
Director 



ORAL SURGERY 






Dr. L. Mandel 



Dr. A. Minervini 



Dr. H. H.iu i mash 



54 




II' 



f 

t 






Dr. W. Savoy 



Dr. T. Bundranl 



Dr. L. Loscalzo 






Dr. B. Sbaitan 



Dr. W.Greenfield 



Dr. K. Daglian 






<r- 



\> 



Dr. J. Anderson 



Dr. D. Schube 



Dr. B. KJalskin 






Dr M. Stern 



Dr. M.Ames 



Dr. R. BaumMark 



55 




Solomon N. Rosenstein, D.D.S. 
Director 



Congratulations to the graduates of 1969. The teach- 
ing staff of the Division of Periodontics wishes you 
success and happiness in your professional careers. 
Dentistry is involved in new trends in the distribution 
of health services, and these will present many oppor- 
tunities and challenges to you in the days to come. 

The children of our nation represent a large segment 
of the population singled out to be the major benefi- 
ciaries of increased dental services through direct 
institutional government grants for child care, state 
"medicaid" programs, and prepaid insurance plans. 

To fulfill the purposes of pedodontics, you must 
fashion your approach to child patients so that new 
awarenesses are created. They must become cognizant 
of the need for cooperation, the need for good dental 
health and care, and the need for preventive measures. 
Your knowledge of the principles of child development 
will help you to create awarenesses which will lead to 
motivation. 

The provision of complete dental care for children 
involves all forms of dental services, with greatest 
emphasis on preventive dentistry. In this way, den- 
tistry can enable the children of today to become the 
adults of tomorrow with complete, intact, healthy den- 
titions contributing to good health, appearance, per- 
sonality , and communication with one another. 
Solomon N. Rosenstein, D.D.S. 



PEDODONTICS 







Dr. B. Nathanson 



Dr. M. Berg 



Dr.W.Verlin 



Dr. J. Schroff 







Dr. G. Kiriakopoulos 



Dr. P. Kulncr 



Dr. K. Levin 



Dr. A. Rosenberg 



56 



As you take leave of Columbia, it is quite natural that 
you should experience a variety of emotions. There 
will of course be a sense of pride in your 
accomplishment — you have earned the title, Doctor of 
Dental Surgery. There may be sadness at the thought of 
separation from classmates and instructors with whom 
you have developed a feeling of friendship. There may 
be some uncertainty regarding the future. 

It may be trite but no less than true to say that you 
are beginning your career at a time of rapid change in 
almost all aspects of life. There is no doubt that the 
practice of dentistry is undergoing modification, and 
that in your professional lifetime methods of practice 
will alter quite markedly from those in vogue now. It is 
your privilege and your responsibility to guide those 
changes in such a way that the best interests of the 
public and the profession are served. These alterations 
include not only those of a scientific and technical 
nature but also those of political and social conse- 
quence. Resolve now to keep abreast of current de- 
velopments in your profession and to take an active 
part in professional and community affairs. In this way 
your life will be a full and rewarding experience. 
\icholas A. DiSali'o. D.D.S.. PhD 




Nicholas A. DiSalvo, D.D.S., Ph.D. 
Director 



ORTHODONTICS 







Dr. W. Spengeman 



Dr. A. Braida 



Dr. M.Gleidman 



Dr. R. Gleidman 




. 








Dr. C. Chaycs 



Dr. E.Tcllsch 



Dr. J. Kaplan 



Dr.J.Tarshis 



57 




Dr. Joseph M. Leavitt 
Director 



The endodontic staff extends its sincere congratulations to 
the members of the class of 1969 on their graduation and wishes 
them a lifetime filled with success and satisfaction in the grow- 
ing, ever-changing profession of Dentistry. 

The past quarter century has seen the inexorable evolve- 
ment of Dentistry in the direction of increasing emphasis on 
principles and techniques concerned with the retention of all 
important elements of the patient's dentition in a physiological 
healthy state. 

The growing importance of Endodontics as a prime element 
in "Retentive Dentistry" can be pointed up by simply 
mentioning that during the past seventeen years, endodontic 
teaching time in our undergraduate curriculum has more than 
tripled and a full postgraduate program started, while the 
staff has grown from two general practioners with a collateral 
interest in Endodontics to a present total of 12 men, eleven of 
whom are recognized specialists in their field. During that 
same time, it is interesting to note, the number of endodontic 
specialists in the Greater New York area has grown from two to 
more than fifty men. 

It will be your function in practice to continually provide for 
your patients the best that Dentistry has to offer, which makes 
constant study and restudy a necessary part of the future mod- 
ern dental practitioner's life. 

In the last analysis, success and satisfaction in Dentistry will 
be based on your ability to keep yourself equipped to provide 
as close as possible to the ultimate in dental services and your 
moral determination to "do unto each patient what you would 
wish done unto yourself." 

We wish you all the very best of luck in these endeavors. 



ENDODONTICS 








Dr. I.Naidorf 



Dr. M. Firdman 



Dr. F. Goodman 



58 





^ur^* 





Dr. W. Miller 



Dr. S. Moreinis 



Dr. H. Vogel 




► 





Dr. F. Rothcnberg 



Dr. M. Cantor 



Dr. G. Besen 







— 


\ % 


i 


; i 




Dr. Solomon 



Dr. H.Blum 



59 



DENTAL AUXILIARY UTILIZATION 




George L. O'Grady, D.D.S. 

Associate Professor 
Assistant Dean 



Upon you, the dentist of the future, rests the task 
of preventing and treating oral diseases, irregulari- 
ties and deficiencies through dedication to and use 
of the latest dental technology in clinical practice, 
dental health education and public health measures. 
It is incumbent upon you to provide new and better 
dental care for more and more people. 

One way to accomplish this is more efficient util- 
ization of your dental auxiliaries. You must adopt 
concepts of four-handed dentistry to keep the 
hands of the dentist and the chairside assistant busy 
at all times. You must divest yourselves of the time- 
consuming minutia involved in your practices so 
that you can devote your entire talents to those du- 
ties which you alone can perform. 

Your auxiliary help must be educated to perform 
these tasks to assist in attaining this goal. However, 
to most effectively utilize your auxiliaries, particu- 
larly your chairside assistant, you must change as 
well the traditional concept of the dental office. You 
must use only the latest and most modern equip- 
ment for without it the concept of four-handed 
dentistry cannot be fully employed. 

You have received the finest dental education 
possible and now you must put it into practice in 
accordance with the highest ideals of your chosen 
profession. You must also provide maximum service 
for your patients. Therefore, my advice to you is 
after having chosen the location of your office, se- 
lect your equipment wisely and with an eye to the 
future. Employ trained, qualified auxiliaries at the 
earliest possible moment in your careers. 

George L. O'Grady, D.D.S. 




60 





Dr. A. Linz 



Dr. M. Blake 



ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL 



The two week dental clerkship at the Roosevelt Hospital is designed to 
acquaint the senior dental student with the broader perspective of total health 
care. He is given an opportunity to see patients with varied disease processes, 
many of which he has heard mentioned in his preclinical years. In addition, he 
sees the role of the oral surgeon within the total spectrum of hospital care. 
During his two week stay at Roosevelt he becomes acquainted with the general 
functions of the hospital. He sees and assists in the emergency room and oper- 
ating room. He is given an opportunity to attend ward and special rounds. He 
comes into contact with varied services of a modern hospital including the 
medical records department, speech therapy, physical medicine and rehabili- 
tation and the hospital's laboratories. 

By bringing his dental school training to the hospital he is enabled to 
evaluate the role which these services play in relation to patients with oral as 
well as general medical and surgical problems. 

We at Roosevelt derive a sense of satisfaction in being able to provide the 
graduating dentist with a glimpse of the role of the hospital in total care of 
patients. We further hope that what we have been able to contribute will be of 
value to both the Columbia graduate and, through him, to the dental profes- 
sion at large. 

Gerald E. Lederman, D.D.S. 
Andrew M. Linz, D.D.S. , M.S. 



61 




Florence V. Moore 
Director oj Clinic 



PERSONNEL 





W 




J. Lamas 



M. Roehrig 



I.Ras 



E. Boyd 







N.Vero 



R. Wrong 



M. McGrath 



M. Bracerio 







* -* 




K. Berbcrelly 



C. Febles 



W. Manigault 



L. Parry 



62 



J i 

G. Musterman 




7? 



C. Betancourt 




H. Bracero 




R. Toribio 





I. Rojas 




J.Padillo 







-A 



. Dennehy 




J. Connolly 




J 



>0 



Mrs. Duffy 




L. Rojas 





l 



A.O'Donnell 





D.Vega 




G. Parry 







J Hart 




M.Kubiak 




L. Casillas 



B Gregory' 



K. Novell 



R. Tarantino 



63 



PRECLINICAL 




; 




i 




Dr. M. Moss 



Dr. E. Applebaum 



Dr. D.Smith 






Dr. H. Kessler 



Dr. M. Nocenti 



Dr. W.Rogers 







Dr.C. Noback 



Dr. R. Rankow 



Dr. M. Blake 



64 



SCIENCES 






Dr. M. Carpenter 



Dr. L. Cizek 






Dr. F. Hoffman 



Dr. N. Kahn 



Dr.J.Caltell 





Dr. S. Simbonis 



Dr. S.Wang 



65 



UNDERGRADUATES 





UNDERGRADUATES 



CLASS OF 1970 




STANDING: R. Gabriele, R. Santise, B. Bienstock, C. Evans, F. Petronclla, J. Gold, D. Dudley. 
SEA TED: G. Robinson, S. Sachs, D. Kritchman, C. Meese, M. Bass. 



Clinical Impressions 
There are two extremes to education. 
It was a busy year which we lived and not it is done. 
One is a mechanical technique. 
Despite the large energy input, a backward glance 

leaves one at a loss to enumerate vast personal 

accomplishments. 
Memorized and performed correctly it can be successful. 
Many facets of the man have hopefully been buffed — 

not to a high lustre, but merely to an inspired glow. 
The other extreme is a criticism and desire, born from 

within, to execute a procedure perfectly to help 

another human being. 
One should never despair: there are encouraging signs 

for all. 
This, our third year together, found us betwixt the two. 



68 



^4 £,-.' v>eJ 




STANDING: I. Gellella.J. Olson, L. Gardner, J. Uhl, G. Hunlress, A. Fink. .<.'£.•( 7 £B. K. Minichel- 
lo, L. Bel man, A. Blitzer, D. Morea, L. Restieri. 



Where once the mouth mirror world seemed quite unreal, 

the bur now cuts a surprisingly graceful swath. 
Our own knowledge was gathered from two sources. 
Many dams were yesterday punched, soaped, stretched 

and fitted, only to be cursed, both by operator 

and operatee. 
Personal failures and successes taught many things. 
Now enjoying the advantage of wide experience, it has 

become perfectly clear to each and every one of us 

that this latex device improves visability and also 

reduces significantly the incidence of rubber dam 

clamp aspiration. 
But the best teachers of all were those men who gave 

of their time and effort that we might someday see 

. . . and perhaps understand. 
.•1 mid the faint odor of compound, the emescoian whine, 

and the mouths of the masses, the clinic goes on . . . 

and on . . . 

CAMJCG 



69 



CLASS OF 1971 




STANDING: S. Tushman, T. Turvey, G. Ranta, S. Peiser, K. Oen, P. Winston, A. Oliveri, S. Steu- 
rer, D. Lynn, M. Golan, R. Mclntyre. SEATED: R. Fleishman, S. Goldberg, H. Gralnick, J. 
McCosker, A. Trojanas,J. Lipton. 



Streptococci, spirochetes and assorted other little 
creatures made the start of our second year before the 
mast most interesting. As it turned out, the fate these 
and other pathogens offered seemed insignificant 
indeed, when compared to that afforded by the grades 
we received in microbiology. The moral being, look 
before you leap or speak softly and carry a big blood 
agar plate. 

Imminently acquainted with our microorganic 
friends, we felt ever confident to face up to the chal- 
lenges presented by pharmacology, pathology and the 
dental courses. M. Golan's sincere effort in periodontal 
problems led him to some inside research in the area. 



70 



O <^; 



. a 







STANDING: J- T riant, W. Kucaba, R. Kroll, N. Campman, S. Lchrhaupt, A. Homicz, R. Wczman, 
D. Christian, C. Jcllinck, R. DeLukc. SEA TED: P. Rogow, M. Swerdloff, T. Finken, M. Tucker, E. 
Shabcr,J. Kleiman. 



The increasing prominence of the dental courses 
became even more prevalent in the third trimester. 
What is dental school coming to? 

Strengthened by the returns of the first pathology- 
exam and if not by them, at least by Dr. King's own 
brand of tea (definitely of the flow-through variety), 
we proceeded on. Handily managing prosthetics and 
operative dentistry, we became so assured that not 
even the sight of an inlay impression being flattened by 
a size 15 shoe, a la I. Cohen, was enough to disturb us. 
With these and sundry other skills acquired in dental 
materials, we became ever more set upon our predeter- 
mined course, June 1971 and a D.D.S. Degree. 

It's with these thoughts uppermost in our minds that 
we look forward expectantly to the clinical years. 



71 



CLASS OF 1972 




STANDING: T. Shannon, E. Savad, B. Williams, D. Frie, D. Palladino, J. Decarlo, M. Greene, G. 
Johnson, J. Pane. SITTING: G.Perry J. Klein, G. Finder, B. Loffredo, S. Zwibak, M. Mailer)'. 
KNEELING: R. Spaulding, M. Kafka, N. Vero, E. Sonnenberg, L. Weiskopf, S. Masyr. 



Uncertain but enthusiastic members of the Class of 
1972 embarked upon their dental careers with the 
words of the orientation lecturers streaming into one 
ear, and the sagacious phrases of Albert rumbling out 
the other. The excitement and glamour of life in the 
"big hospital" soon was replaced by the not so glamor- 
ous business of becoming expert in the field of gross 
anatomy. The first set of exams soon separated the men 
from the boys — and the 45 boys continued gamely 
onward. 

By this time, we had become one big happy family 
and certain individuals distinguished themselves in 
various ways. The class members and professors alike 
were amazed at Michael's astounding knowledge of 
superficial fascia, and his never-ending barrage of 
questions on this and all other subjects. Benjie's over- 
whelming knowledge of anatomy, histology, embryol- 
ogy and Uncle Max impressed one and all, while Bud's 



72 




STANDING: W. Martini, P. Bacal, A. Goldberg, J. Peterson, H. Gellert, R. Ciccone, A. Cryan, T. 
O'Neil, H. Nisselson, M. Brady, B. Pollak, M. Richling. SITTING: J. D'Agrosa, R. Tropp, J. 
Wegweiser, S. SchifT, D. Goteiner, L. HandeUman. KNEELING: J- Cantor, S. Gelfman, R. Kuhn, 
D. Rubenslein, H. Rankow, K. Levene. 

artistic prowess in dental anatomy lab became appar- 
ent from the start. 

Christmas vacation provided everyone with a well 
deserved rest, which was quickly terminated by Jan. 
6 — the panic. We were "two weeks behind" when the 
year began, and suddenly found ourselves drifting 
further away. Dental anatomy introduced us for the 
first time to the essentials of our future profession, and 
after a few weeks we all knew lingual surfaces like the 
backs of our teeth. 

With all these experiences behind us, and many 
more, the class of 1972 is prepared to forge ahead in a 
never ending quest towards excellance in the basic 
sciences and proficiency in dental techniques secure in 
the knowledge that we've all "had it last year." 

Barry Loffredo 



73 



ACTIVITIES 





ACTIVITIES 



ALPHA OMEGA 




STANDWG: L. Harris, S. Fein, S. Lerhaupt, A. Klein, I. Cohen, H. Gralnick, J. Lipton, M. Rubin. 
SEA TED: S. Peiser, S. Davis, C. Young, M Berger,E. Shulman, M.Golan. 



Alpha Omega is only a small part of organized dentistry, but through its high 
ideals of Fraternalismand Professionalism, it promotes excellence in dentistry 
and community service not only on behalf of itself, but for all dentistry. 
Through its aid given to Israel's dental school it has helped spread the high 
level of American dentistry abroad. Within its organization in this country, 
seminars and conventions have not only spread current trends in modern den- 
tistry, but have helped formulate and propogate new ideas. 

Our chapter is just a small part of this, but it too strives to maintain the ide- 
als of the entire organization. At Columbia its importance as a separate body is 
lessened because of the school's small size and the overall fraternalism that 
permeates our institution. 

With the combined background of Columbia's excellence in dentistry and 
our fraternity's strong feelings of service and search for knowledge, each of us 
will leave Columbia richly endowed with the high qualities that make us 
proud to be members of the Dental Profession. 



76 



PSI OMEGA 




STANDING: C. Guelakis, A. Mehrhof.J. Wasileski, G. Eshelman, R. Bowden, SEA TED: D. Morca, 
D. Zegarelli, M. Fidler, G. Huntress, D. Dudley. 




STANDING: P. Swallow, F. Petronella, R. Mclnlyre, T. Finken, T. Uhl, S. Steurer, D. Lynn. SIT- 
TING: R- Fleischman, G. Ranta, A. Olivieri, K. Oen.J. McCosker. 



A basic purpose of Gamma Lambda is to engender an atmosphere for closer 
contact professionally, fraternally and socially among its members, both 
undergraduate and graduate. The fraternity attempts to provide a medium for 
greater compatibility and understanding among its brothers which is not 
always easy to accomplish in the academic surroundings of school. The prime 
objective of the fraternity is to assert in the development of character enabling 
each brother to bring honor and esteem to himself and his profession. 

Our deepest appreciation must go to Dr. Albert Zengo and Dr. Joseph 
Dejulia for the invaluable assistance and guidance rendered to Gamma 
Lambda during this past year. Our gratitude is extended to all those brothers 
who contributed to our organization. 

Fondest wishes go to our graduating brothers. The hope is that they will 
continue to help Psi Omega as one of the most esteemed dental fraternities in 
the world. 

Michael Fidler 
Grand Master 



77 



WILLIAM JARVIE SOCIETY 




STANDING: D. Zegarelli, C. Guelakis,B. Goodkin, A. Pintoff, A. Klein, D. Krili hiii.ni . I) Morea, 
L. Restieri, A. Blitzer. SEA TED: G. Huntress, J. Uhl, A. Mehrhof, E. Schulman. 



The William Jarvie Society was founded in 1920 by Dr. William Gies. It was 
named for a man whose untiring efforts did so much to promote interest in 
dental research. 

Admission to the society is on the basis of academic standing, and a professed 
demonstrated interest in dental research. 

Each member of the society is expected to engage in individual or group 
research projects. This year the major efforts of the society have been directed 
towards the publication of a journal which will reflect the research activities 
and interests of the students and the faculty of the School of Dental and Oral 
Surgery. We sincerely hope that this journal will become an integral part of 
the academic atmosphere of this institution. 



78 



HONOR BOARD 




STANDING: N. Vcro, R. Rutin, T. Finken, M. Equi. SEA TED: R. Bowden.C. Mecse, E. Shulman, 
J. Sandburg. 



Since its inception the honor code has strived to become an integral part of 
the professional tradition of our school; to be more than an external body of 
rules dictating the actions of students and faculty, but rather an internal desire 
to build within each of us a feeling of respect, of integrity and of responsibility 
toward our patients and colleagues. These should be at the foundation of what 
we call Professionalism. 

I have been a member of the honor board for four years and have grown to 
know, possibly better than most, the need for building a sense of Professional- 
ism in each of us. Some will have gone throught their brief introduction to 
dentistry and continued on without these feelings. They have missed much. 
The rest have come to know the good feeling of our professional tradition. 

To the four short years we pass at Columbia the honor code has added just a 
little to making each of us better people. 



79 



STUDENT COUNCIL 




STANDING: K. Minichello, E. Sonnenberg, H. Rankow, H. Gellert, S. Homicz, P. Winston, J. 
Triant, R. Fleishman. SEA TED: A. Mehrhof, B. Goodkin, D. Brown, C. Evans, D. Kritchman. 



During the past year, universities throughout the country have been con- 
fronted with demands for student power and student's rights. Columbia 
University has responded to these demands as evidenced by the inclusion of 
students in most phases of restructuring proposals. The School of Dental and 
Oral Surgery has responded in like manner. 

The year began with a reevaluation and reorganization of our student 
government, the Student Council. The goal of this Student Council has been to 
bring student views to the attention of the faculty and administration. We have 
found both of these groups to be quite receptive to our ideas and have found 
them willing to have us assume additional responsibilities. If this trend contin- 
ues, the Student Council will surely reach its potential as a meaningful student 
government. 



80 



STUDENT DENTAL ASSOCIATION 




Standing: K. Minichello, G. Eshelman (Ass't Sr. Advisor), C. Meese, C. Young, J. McCosker, M. 
Fidler (Sr. Advisor on Technical Matters) Sealed: R. Bollon (Sec), R. Gabriele (Vice-President), J. 
Wasileski (President), P. Rogow (Treasurer) 



The Student Dental Association endeav- 
ors to inculcate in its student members the 
ideals of professionalism and scholarship 
that will carry them in good stead through- 
out their undergraduate and professional 
careers. Based on these goals the organiza- 
tion has contributed to the ever expanding 
role of the dentist in society. 

The programs of the Association are varied 
and tend to supplement and broaden the 
scope of formal school training. The high- 
light of the year is the annual Student Clin- 
ic Day. At this time the student members 
present table clinics on current and theo- 
retical procedures and examine the trends of 
dental thinking and experimentation. 

Thus membership in the Student Dental 
Association prepares the graduate for the 
demands that his profession and society will 
make upon him. 



81 



OMICRON KAPPA UPSILON 




Dr. E. L. Uccellani and Dr. J. A. Cuttita 



The admission to membership in this national 
honorary dental fraternity is made on the basis of 
professional maturity and integrity, and contribu- 
tions to dentistry, as well as the attainment of out- 
standing scholastic achievement during the four 
years of dental education. The constitution provides 
that each chapter elect to membership not more than 
twelve percent of a graduating senior class, the se- 
lection to be based on high scholarship and out- 
standing character. To be selected as a recipient of 
this award should be a gratifying experience, es- 
pecially if the history of Omicron Kappa Upsilon is 
considered. The fraternity had its origin on June 26, 
1913, in a petition from the class of 1914 at North- 
western Dental School to its Dean, Dr. G.V. Black. 
Through his efforts, there were ten dental schools 
participating by 1915, while at present there are 
fifty-five chapters. 

The guiding principle of the fraternity is symbol- 
ized by the Greek letters on its pin. The most prom- 
inent letter in the design is Sigma which stands for 
conservation, and Omicron and Upsilon the initial 
letters for the Greek words meaning teeth and 
health appear within the larger symbol of 
conservation. 

Columbia University was granted a charter and 
became a component chapter — Epsilon Epsilon — in 
1934. The members of Epsilon Epsilon Chapter ex- 
tend to you, the class of 1968, our heartiest congrat- 
ulations and best wishes for a lifetime of success and 
happiness in your chosen profession. We sincerely 
hope that your professional career will be guided 
by the standards you have been taught and by the 
high principles which have served our members. 

Dr. Joseph A. Cuttita 
Secretary- Treasurer 
82 




H:9*S 



Jl 



DENTAL * OLUMBIAN 





Editors Lloyd Harris 

Julius Kunofsky 

Dental Hygiene Editor Theresa Nitzling 

Photography Jack Goetz 

Steven Fein 

Business Manager Alan Klein 

Associate Editor Michael Rubin 



83 



DENTAL HYGIENE 




Mrs. Patricia M. McLean, R.D.H., M.A. 
Director 



The Dental Hygiene Program of Columbia is privileged in 
having as its director Mrs. Patricia McLean. Mrs. McLean, 
President of the American Dental Hygienist's Association, is a 
dynamic leader and educator in the profession. Amidst her 
many duties, both at school and with the Association, she 
always has time for her students. Her genuine graciousness, 
generosity and warmth endears her to all, and those who study- 
under her find her a constant source of inspiration. 



84 



Miss Diane Curl, instructor in Dental Hygiene, has 
led a very active life within the profession. She is 
President-elect of the Dental Hygientists Association 
of the City of New York and serves on various commit- 
tees in all levels of the association, local and national. 
As faculty advisor of the Junior Chapter of A.D.H.A. 
— Columbia, she keeps us all aware of the importance 
of membership and unity. 

Besides her regular teaching duties with the A, B, 
and Masters students, Miss Curl coordinates our teach- 
ing experiences in such programs as "Head Start", and 
the "Follow-Through Program". It may be easiest to 
sum this up bv saving, she likes people and people love 
her. 




M. Diane Curl, R.D.H., M.S. 



FACULTY 



Nancv L. Sistv, R.D.H., M.S. 




Miss Nancy Sisty is a member of the New York City 
American Dental Hygiene Association Executive Board 
in addition to being a dynamic instructor in Dental 
Hygiene. Her students are from both the Masters and 
Senior A program, whom she also taught in their 
junior year. Miss Sisty also conducts the Habit Therapy 
Clinic, serving the Orthodontic Department as a part 
time Research Assistant. The Habit Therapy Clinic 
deals with the etiology and symptomology of oral hab- 
its affecting occlusion, mastication, deglutition, facial 
expression, and speech. 

During the past year her students have come to 
endear and greatly respect her in the capacity of Clini- 
cal Supervisor and Senior A Class Advisor. One of her 
students described her by saying that she is adept in 
motivating her students while instructing them in both 
a classroom and clinical situation. 



85 




Miss Carolyn M. James, Instructor in Dental 
Hygiene, graduated from Centenary College for 
Women. A product of Columbia's Bachelors and Mas- 
ters programs, Miss James has gone on to become one 
of our most valued faculty members. She teaches oral 
prophylaxis techniques, Dental Hygiene I to the Junior 
A students and Advanced Dental Hygiene to Junior B 
students. Her enthusiasm for her profession is seen not 
only through her teaching ability but in her active 
membership on the Education Committee in the Den- 
tal Hygienists Association of the State of New York. 



Carolyn M.James, R.D.H., M.S. 



Julie A. Wehrle, R.D.H., M.S. 



Miss Julie A. Wehrle, Instructor in Dental Hygiene 
has led both an interesting and inspiring life. Receiv- 
ing her training as a Dental Hygienist at the University 
of Pennsylvania she went on to become the supervisor 
of the dental clinic on the S.S. Hope hospital ship for 
its first five years and four tours to South America, 
Africa and Indonesia. Returning to Columbia to 
receive her B.S. and M.S., Miss Wehrle has become our 
instructor in Public Health, Hopital Administration 
and Practice and the Scientific Foundation of Dental 
Hygiene to the Masters and Senior B students. 




86 



Mrs. Man 1 McCue, Administrative Assistant to Mrs. 
McLean and buddy to all! Mrs. McCue is the mother of 
six children, four sons and two daughters. Her son 
Sean is a Medical Student at the University of Bologna 
and her youngest son is in the sixth grade. Her husband 
is a grand, handsome, silver headed man — to which all 
will attest. Her cool headedness and understanding 
endears her to all who know her. 




Mrs. Mary McCue 
Administrative Assistant 



STAFF 



Joan Opperman 





87 



MASTERS 1969 



The growing Masters of Science degree, established in 1952, 
was designed to fill the demand for women with graduate 
education. It is designed to prepare its candidates for positions 
in administration, public health, dental hygiene, teaching or 
educational, and clinical research. The program is handled on 
a full or part-time basis and is completed in one academic year. 







m . P 


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i 







MARY ANN ATKINSON 

R.D.H., B.S., Columbia 

M.S., Columbia 



JOY ELLEN BEBBLING 

R.D.H., B.S.. University of Southern California 

M.S., Columbia 



88 





ELLEN ANN BeGOLE 

R.D.H., B.S., Univ. of Michigan 

M.S., Columbia 



HELEN BLACKMAN 

R.D.H.. A.S.. Imperial Valley College 

B.S., Univ. oj Southern California 

M.S., Columbia 




'OBSERVATIOS' 




(Not Photographed) 

EDA COLE 

R.D.H.. Baylor College of Dentistry 

B.S., Univ. of Washington 

M.S.. Columbia 



KATHLYN COAN 

R.O.H., Western Michigan Univ. 
B.S., Columbia 

M.S., Columbia 



89 





JENNIFER L. DAY 

R.D.H., Cert. ofD.H., Univ. of Oregon 

Dental School 

B.S., Univ of Oregon 

M.S., Columbia 



SUZANNE B. FARNAM 

R.D.H., Fones School of Dental Hygiene 

B.S., Univ. of Bridgeport 

M.S., Columbia 





m^^^^^^m 




w^ ^£T 1 




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1 






"Yea. I know — // didn't hurt you one bit! 
But me . . . ?.'" 



90 



HARRIET R. GLICKMAN 

R.D.H., Cert, of D.H., Forsythe School 

for Dental Hygienists 

B.S., Columbia 

M.S., Columbia 



f 


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u 




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MARJORIE JANE HEALEY 

R.D.H.. A. A., San Bernardine I alley College 

B.S., Columbia 

M.S., Columbia 



CAROLYN SUE HOBERMAN 

B.D.H., Univ. of Pennsylvania 

B.S. Temple University 

M.S., Columbia 





JANET KAY HOTGER 
R.D.H., B.S.. University oj Iowa 

M.S.. Columbia 



91 





KATHLEEN SILKO 

R.D.H., Eastman School of Dental Hygiene 

B.S., California State College of Pa. 

M.S., Columbia 



AILEEN SILVERMAN 

R.D.H., B.S., Fairleigh Dickenson Univ. 

M.S. Columbia 





OUR LADIES AT WORK' 



HELEN E. ST A MAS 
R.D.H., Eastman School for Dental Hygiene 
B.S., Temple University 
92 M.S., Columbia 





ROSEMARIE VALENTINE 

R.U.H., Univ. of Pennsylvania 

B.S., Bloomsburg Stale College 

M.S., Columbia 



DOROTHY JEAN WOOTON 

R.I). II.. Eastman School oj Dental Hygiene 

B.S., Cortland State Teachers College 

M.S., Columbia 



u n r 




"WHAT'D VOL' SAY THEY SERVED ON 
THA I BOA T. MERLE"? 



93 



PROGRAM A 1969 



Program A, a two year program of dental hygiene education 
is offered to students who have completed two years of study in 
a college or university approved by Columbia. The students 
admitted to this program are made aware of their part in the 
design of the "Dental Health Team": they become part of a 
health service that requires a generous investment of time and 
energy and awareness of personal as well as social obligation. 

Upon graduation, the student is awarded a certificate of 
dental hygiene in conjunction with a Bachelor of Science 
degree. She is then qualified to enter private practice, public 
health, dental health education or continue her studies for a 
Masters Degree. 



BETTY ECKHAUS 

Jackson College 
B.S., Columbia 



LINDA MARGARET HANN 

La Verne College 
B.S., Columbia 





94 





DEBORAH HARBACH 

Plattsburgh State College 
B.S., Columbia 



TERRE LYNN HODGE 

Orange Coast College 
B.S., Columbia 




EXCEDRIS HEA DA CHE = 11 




JANICE NOBUKO ISHIDA 

Portland State College 
B.S., Columbia 



95 





ELAINE ROSE KANCYR 

Endicoll Junior College 
B.S., Columbia 



ELANE PAULA KOLBERG 

Hunter College 
B.S., Columbia 




JEANNE MORROW 

Santa Barbara City College 
B.S., Columbia 







96 



"Don't Jump Jo— you'll 
pass your boards!" 





rrvoerrr PHoafrvfte 
die Foot*x> l^tHE 
sTUpe**** manual t 




ONE* WELL flEAb 




JUDITH NELSON SIEGEL 

Marymount College 

B. S., Columbia 





GAYLE JOYCE PERSON 

University oj Illinois 
B.S., Columbia 



97 



LYNDA JO SALSBURY 

Pasadena College 
B.S., Columbia 




BONNIE LYNN SAUER 

Marymount College of Va. 
B.S., Columbia 



CLASS OF 1970— JR. A 






/ J 




Standing: S. Kucar, J. Sexson, D. Currie, A. Flette, B. Hyatt, C. Themann 
Seated: U. Goldsmith, B. Ma, J. Yee, L. Boutin 



98 



PROGRAM B— 1969 



This program was designed for graduates of certifi- 
cate dental hygiene programs and provides an excel- 
lent opportunity to increase competency through study 
while in service. The students are prepared for teach- 
ing positions in basic dental hygiene programs and 
administrative positions in public health. 

Upon graduation the student is awarded a Bachelor 
of Science degree with a concentrated area of study 
within dental hygiene education. 



ADELE MARIA CARTLEDGE 

R.D.H., A.A.S., X. Y.C. Community Coll. 
B.S., Columbia 



MERLE NANCY HERBERT 

R.D.H.. Forsyth School for Dent. Hygienists 

A.Sc, Northeastern University 

B.S., Columbia 





I 



99 





JOANNE RITA HOFFMAN 

R.D.H., Forsyth School for Dent. Hygienists 

A.Sc, Northeastern University 

B.S., Columbia 



KAREN LYN JONES 

R.D.H., University of Pa. 

B.S., Columbia 




NANCY L. MORSE 

R.D.H..A.S., Westbrookjr. College 

B.S., Columbia 




100 





LINDA ANNA MUELLER 

R.D.H., A.A.S., Hudson Valley Comm. Coll. 

B.S., Columbia 



THERESA JOSEPHINE NITZLING 

R.D.H., A.A.S., X.Y.C. Comm. Coll. 

B.S., Columbia 





JEANETTE TERESA PHILLIPS 

R.D.H., A.A.S., Iniversity of Vl. 

B.S., Columbia 



101 



JR. A.D.H.A. 




J. Hoffman (Pres.), B. Sauer (Corres. Sec), G. Person 
(Vice-Pres.), L. Hann (Recording Sec.), N. Morse (Treas.) 



The Junior American Dental Hygienist's Association 
has as its objectives the following goals: 

First, to prepare students for active, informed partic- 
ipation in the parent, professional association, The 
American Dental Hygienist's Association. 

Second, to cultivate, promote, and sustain the art and 
science of dental hygiene. 

Third, to represent and safeguard the common inter- 
ests of members of the profession. 

Fulfillment of these objectives is made possible 
during the three hour weekly period provided in the 
schedule of all students. Students elect their officers 
and executive board members and prepare their 
annual program in a manner similar to that of all local 
parent associations. 



CLASS OF 1970— JR. B. 



Standing: G. Brown, E. Neenan, K. Grammatico, P. Edd 
Seated: B. Novak, J. Cochrane, I. Biller 








102 






"I Heard Dorm Life Was Rough 
But . . 



"Should A Gentleman Offer A Tipar- 
illo to His Dental Hygienist?" 



"The Clinic is Over, Hurrah, Hur- 
rah!" 




"Screening the Juniors for Their Senior Year But the Screen Fell Through!' 






"What Even- Good Hygienist Should 

Possess!" 



"Why . . . Today it Tastes Like Cof- 
fee Too!" 



"Don't You Camera Bugs Ever Go 
Away?!" 



103 



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blades to answer any anatomical or morpho- 
logical difficulty, or any technique problem. Our 
design and casting techniques also make it 
possible for us to custom shape blades to facili- 
tate implants in difficult or borderline areas. 



n~\n 






RJ& 



PARK DENTAL RESEARCH CORP. 

19 WEST 34th STREET NEW YORK. N. Y 10001 
PHONE: (212)736-0550 



, design leader in custom implant products. 



108 



Because you never 
stop learning, 
Jelenko never 
stops teaching 

One of our five educational centers 
will be at your service with clinics and 
lectures wherever you practice. 

One of our 35 district representatives 
will be "your" man, always available 
for technical consultation. 

Members of the Jelenko team are on 
the scene at the national and at state 
and local meetings. Their lectures and 
table clinics can become a valued part 
of your continuing education. 

Our authoritative publications will fill 
you in on gold technics, developments 
in equipment, ceramics, supplies and 
visual aids. 

Our slides and films will keep your 
dental society abreast of prosthetic 
developments. 

You never stop learning. We never 
stop teaching. 



J.F 



JELENKO 



&CO..INC. 

170 Petersville Road / New Rochelle, NY. 10801 
Look to Jelenko for Progress in Prosthetics 




NEW ROCHELLE 




* »u* 



■ 



109 



$r^ 




Sleek, slim, and trim 

the S. S. WHITE® 

Revelation® Chair 

is the comfort-inspired 

contour chair, 

the ultra-modern chair 

with the smooth back. 

Nothing to get in your 

way when the patient 

is seated or in a 

reclining position. 

It's convertible, 

and readily adapts 

to every technic. 
y Pleasant to touch, 

genuine leather is 

durable and luxurious. 

For more information, write 

S. S. WHITE COMPANY. 

a Division of 

Pennsalt Chemicals 

Corporation. 

Philadelphia, 
\Pennsylvania 1910S. 



no 



DO select a full service dental supply company 

having all the important major equipment 

lines to plan your office. 
DO ask to see their service department. 
DO ask how many servicemen they have on their 

payroll. 
DO ask if they employ equipment specialists who 

do nothing but lay-outs. 
DO ask to see their sundry merchandise shelves. 



DON'T sign a lease before you consult a lawyer, 
and your selected dental dealer. Too 
many pit-falls could cost you much grief 
and more money. 

DON'T worry too much about financing if you 
are tight for money — the banks we know 
are quite liberal with the new dentist 
opening his office. 



DO drop us a note six months before you get out of 
service to be on the look-out for a good location. 



We pride ourselves on the many beautiful offices we 
have equipped — we would like to add your office to 
our roster! 



M. A. SECHTER 

DENTAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES CO. INC. 

New York: 3960 Broadway, New York City 

New Jersey: 382 Main St., Hackensack 



111 




As soon as 

YOUR 

NAME 

is on the 

door 



Plan to visit an 

AUSTENAL 

DISTRIBUTOR 

LABORATORY 

near you . . . 





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For a complete, versatile service in every 
phase of prosthetics the nearby Austenal Dis- 
tributor Laboratory can serve your needs 
with highest quality materials, products and 
craftsmanship. 



HOWMET 




HOWMET CORPORATION 

DENTAL DIVISION s i o i south keeler avenue 

AUSTENAL PRODUCTS CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60632 



Howmet Corporation- Dental Division 



112 



Success is no accident... 

it is planned for you... by 



m 






^ 



DENTAL SUPPLY, INC. 

233 WEST 42nd STREET • NEW YORK 36, NEW YORK 

NEW YORK LONG ISLAND NEW JERSEY 

(212) LO 5-1740 (516)538-2442 (201)843-2048 

SERVING THE PROFESSION 

Vfvriih ASSISTANCE IN LOCATING YOUR OFFICE 

V^with PERSONALIZED OFFICE PLANNING and DESIGN 

Vt^with FINANCIAL and PRACTICE GUIDANCE and ASSISTANCE 

y/ with ALL THE SUPPLIES and EQUIPMENT A DENTIST NEEDS 

V^ with PLACEMENT AID for DENTISTS 



EMESCO DIA-CARB BURS 

The first important advance in 
dental burs since carbides 

Emesco Dia-Carbs combine — in a single instrument — a fast- 
cutting carbide tip and a smooth-finishing diamond body. 
Available in sizes and shapes for cavity preparation and 
crown preparation. 

Dia-Carbs speed up cavity and crown preparations because 
you can complete most procedures without any bur changes. 

*Patent pending 



INVERTED 
CONE 



TAPERED 
CYLINDER 



LONG 
ROUND HEAD CONE 



{Not illustrated) 
FLAT HEAD 
CYLINDER 



LONG 
FLAT HEAD CONE 



Write for literature 

EMESCO DENTAL CORP. 150 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK, N. Y. 10011 



113 



ORegon 7-7880 
Since 1919 

Chelsea Towel & 
Linen Service 

Coats and Uniforms 

513 East 13th Street 
New York 9, N.Y. 



To The Class of 1969 



Compliments of: 



GAMMA LAMBDA CHAPTER 

PSI OMEGA 
FRATERNITY 



Congratulations 



to the 



Class of 1969 



ETA CHAPTER 

ALPHA OMEGA 
FRATERNITY 



114 



Leaders of 
progress in . 



Best course to take for your future... 



^Altfe/iAon 



PORCELAIN TEETH 

AEsthetic 

AEsthetic Characterized 

Myerson and Sears 

Synchronized 



PLASTIC TEETH 




Dura-Blend Spec/a/ 
Dura-Blend Characterized 
Myerson and Sears 
Synchronized 

CROWN AND BRIDGE 

Dura-Blend Veneers 
Crown and Bridge Resin 
Self-Cure Resin 



MYERSON TOOTH CORPORATION 



90 HAMILTON STREET 



CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 02139 



Serving Dentistry 
and 
Dental Colleges 
for 52 Years 

HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 

DENTAL MODELS 

AND 

BROWN PRECISION ATTACHMENTS 

28-page Illustrated Catalog sent on request. 
(Special Prices for Colleges and Teachers) . 

COLUMBIA DENTOFORM CORPORATION 

131 East 23 Street New York, N.Y. 10010 

"The House of a Thousand Models" 

For lustrous, washable finish on stone or plaster 
models, use Columbia Model Gloss.. S3. 20 per quart. 



DENTAL INSTRUMENTS 
REPAIRED & REPLATED 



PHONE 
W A 3-3165 



FRANK J. MAY 

Mfg. of Dental Instruments of Standard 
and Special Design 



SPECIALIZING IN 
PERIO. INST. 



256 S. 11 TH STREET 
PHILA. PA. 19107 



(jewHi 



X-RAY CHEMICAL CORPORATION 
Tank Service and Dark Room Accessories 



WILLIAM GROSS 



5419 43rd STREET 
MASPETH, N. Y. 11378 
Phone - 392 - 7770-1 



115 




BioblencT Teeth make any denture 
look more natural. 

Bone-like enamel. Wrap around translucency. Internally blended color. These 
are just a few of the esthetic refinements which distinguish Bioblend from 
all other artificial teeth. The result: Bioblend Teeth are now being used more 
often for complete dentures than any other teeth in the world. Any other! 

Available in porcelain or plastic. 



TRUBYTE 



Creator of fine products for dentistry 



The Dentists' Supply Company of N.Y., York, Pennsylvania 



116 




next step, doctor: 
personalize with 

porcelain or plastic 

characterized anteriors from Universal 



Recreate the subtleties and variations of Nature! You can . . . 
with the superb colors and simulated imperfections available in 
Polychrome Anteriors. Polychrome colors are absolutely inter- 
blendable— with the natural dentition and with Universal's 
non-characterized Univac Porcelain and Verident Plastic 
anteriors. For perfect blending of your technical and esthetic 
skills— for total, patient-pleasing harmony within the oral 
environment— create every denture around Polychrome. 



UNIVERSAL DENTAL COMPANY- Academy and Red Lion Roads- Philadelphia, Pa.191 14 



117 



of, on S-C.M'4 OK 



Buy direct from the manufacturer at Wholesale 
CEMENTS 
ALLOYS 
LOCALS 
ACRYLICS 

IMPRESSION MATERIAL 
EXPLORERS 

ORTHODONTIC INSTRUMENTS 

and many others too. 
Send for our Free Illustrated Catalog describing 
the S-C Wholesale Plan with savings up to 40%. 

STRATFORD-COOKSON CO. 

550 Commerce Drive 

Yeadon, Penna. 



AL 4-5626 

RUBINSTEIN 

DENTAL EQUIPMENT CORP. 

CUSTOM BUILT 

TIME AND MOTION EQUIPMENT 

and 

ALL MAKES OF DENTAL EQUIPMENT 

141 FIFTH AVE. COR. 21st ST. 

New York 10,N.Y. 



118 



ra 



PARKELL PRODUCTS can be valuable 
aids in your new office. 

They're all shown in our catalog: our 
extensive selection of forceps, rongeurs 
and other instruments — and our unique 
specialty items ... all fine quality, all 
sensibly priced. 

Let us know your new professional loca- 
tion and we'll send you our catalog. 



PARKELL 

Parkell Building 

Farmingdale, New York 11735 



r=j 



PARKELL PRODUCTS INC. 

155 SCHMITT BLVD. 

FARMINGDALE, NY 11735 

Tel: (516) CH 9-1134 



LM^FJ 



DENTAL INSTRUMENTS 

OF FINEST QUALITY 

MISDOM-FRANK CORP. 

NEW YORK, NY. 10003 



FOR SALE! 

1 GROSS UNUSED ANESTHETIC 
CARPULES 



Contact: 
Dr. E.Cain 



Greetings and Best Wishes 



Association of Dental Alumni 

of 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



Dr. George L. O'Grady — President Dr. Gerald Lederman — Secrefary 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 

GRADUATING CLASS 

OF 1969 

THE MEDICAL CENTER 
BOOKSTORE 



119 







,0°, 



£"•" 




with 
ALUMINOUS 
DENTAL 
PORCELAIN 



AMAZING STRENGTH • Vibrant Natural Color! 




The preparation of such jacket 
crowns with ALUMINOUS DENTAL 
PORCELAIN requires a high 
degree of specialized skill . . . 
skill that is unique with NU-DENT 
artisans who introduced this new 

development to the dental 
profession. For a new experience in 
dental ceramics, try NU-DENT'S 
Jackets with ALUMINOUS 
DENTAL PORCELAIN. 



Now— there are thousands of NU-DENT 
porcelain jackets, made with aluminous 
dental porcelain, in daily use. Once these 
NU-DENT jackets are cemented, they 
are practically fracture-proof. This 
specialized dental porcelain combines with 
crystals of alumina to produce a beautiful 
and translucent material with warm 
and vibrant colors. 




[fill-dent Porcelain Studio, Inc. 

220 Wist 42 St.. H. Y.1003S. N. Y. • Phone — LA 4-3591. 2, 1, 4. J, I 

Please send detailed information on NU-DENT'S 
practice-building restorations. 



Cily 1 Zonc_ 



d 



120 



Lithographed in U.S.A. by 

EDWARDS 
BROTHERS 



3500 SOUTH ST*Tt STREET , 



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